PComp #5 – Garden Box Theremin

I made this sound and light theremin following the Arduino Theremin instructions in the booklet. I used recycled materials from my house including a small cardboard box that housed nut cheese and some magazine photos and tape. I had a bunch of leaves in a vase that were on their way out, and decided to use them to camouflage the inside of the box, the arduino and breadboard. It also creates a little bit of stability for them and making movement less inside the box, the piece is still pretty delicate. I placed it so it still looks wild, the only piece of the circuit that’s visible is the photoresistor. One of the leaves is acting like a lever to open and close the box, triggering the scale in Arduino. There’s a whole in the side of the box to connect USB from Arudino to computer. The photoresistor is triggering the Theremin in the Arduino.

Arduino Theremin Garden Box from Nire ITP on Vimeo.

This is the code I used:
int sensorValue;
int sensorLow = 1023;
int sensorHigh = 0;
const int ledPin = 13;

void setup() {
pinMode(ledPin,OUTPUT);
digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
while (millis() sensorHigh){
sensorHigh = sensorValue;
}
if (sensorValue < sensorLow) {
sensorLow = sensorValue;
}

}
digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
}

void loop() {
sensorValue = analogRead(A0);
int pitch =
map(sensorValue,sensorLow,sensorHigh, 50, 4000);
tone(8,pitch,20);
delay(10);
}

PComp #4 – Keyboard Instrument

When I first set up the circuit board and wrote the code, the first note didn’t play, I tried switching out a button but that didn’t make a difference. Then I unplugged the wire going into the button and the other buttons were still playing notes so I figured maybe that wire needed to be switched out, I think even though it clicked in on both sides, it was a touch too short. Once I put a new wire in, the 1st button started playing.

1st Key Not Working from Nire ITP on Vimeo.

At first there were code errors, I eventually realized that there multiple curly brackets at the end of the code, when I erased them, it ran smoothly.

Playing 15 seconds of “Lean on Me”:

15 seconds Lean On Me Arduino from Nire ITP on Vimeo.

 

 

 

PComp Class #3

Public Interactive Tech: Link NYC, various locations, observed 14th st & 5th ave.

LinkNYC-kiosk-close-up-640x425.jpg

The kiosk has a clean and simple interface. It’s free to use which adds to how people interact with it. There’s something about people having private conversations in public that I think I will always find somewhat odd no matter how used to it I become. With a bigger screen, it seems more toy-like and “futuristic” than the familiar iphone conversation spillage. It’s interesting to look into how fast people get angry or frustrated with a piece of technology since there is no consequence for it or response, although it can lead to less success. I observed some people becoming annoyed at difficulty connecting. Others that were connected and speaking loudly on speaker phone without earbuds which was sweet and funny.

 

LAB: ANALOG IN AND DIGITAL IN & OUT

For the analog input circuit I used a potentiometer and LED and programmed Arduino where the brightness of LED was divided by 4 that allowed the light to dim by turning the potentiometer. For the digital in /out I set up 2 LED light bulbs, I used a program with a conditional that allowed one light bulb to be on without pressing the button, that turned off when button was pressed and the other lit up.

ICM #2 Painstaking Cemetary

I built upon the 1st assignment, making the eyeballs and mouth melt across and down the canvas. I wrote a sun to run randomly and change everytime the script ran. When the mouse moved one of the eyeballs trails across x and y axis with the background not refreshing. When the mouse is clicked the background, nose and mouth change color and the trailing eyes reset. I most likely have some lines in the code that aren’t doing anything as well.

http://alpha.editor.p5js.org/Nire/sketches/SJ6l7EliZ

var eyeballs = 150;
var col = {
r: 255,
g: 0,
b: 0
}

function setup() {
createCanvas(550, 650);
rectMode(CENTER);

background(21,20,250);

// Body
colorMode(230, 0, 80, 100);
stroke(270, 250, 100, 600)
fill(255, 0, 0, 250);
rect(270, 250, 100, 600);

// Eyes
fill(‘rgb(255,634,63)’);
ellipse(150, 115, 200, 100);
ellipse(150, 230, 200, 100);
ellipse(400, 115, 200, 100);
ellipse(400, 230, 200, 100);
ellipse(150, 345, 200, 100);
ellipse(400, 345, 200, 100);

//Lips
fill(250, 0, 150, 220)
ellipse(275, 520, 300, 100);

// Eyes
fill(30);
ellipse(150, 115, 90, 80);
ellipse(eyeballs, 250, 90, 80);
ellipse(400, 115, 90, 80);
ellipse(400, 250, 90, 80);
ellipse(150, 345, 90, 80);
ellipse(400, 345, 90, 80);

}
function draw() {
col = mouseX/2
col.r = random(100, 255);
col.g = 0;
col.b = random(100, 190);
var x = random(width);
var y = random(height)

var r = random(255);
var g = random(255);
var b = random(255);

fill(r, g, b, 100);
triangle(x, y, 0, 0);

// Eyes
fill(‘rgb(255,634,63)’);
ellipse(mouseX, mouseY, 200, 100);
ellipse(eyeballs, 230, 200, 100);
ellipse(400, 115, 200, 100);
ellipse(400, 230, 200, 100);
ellipse(eyeballs, 345, 200, 100);
ellipse(400, 345, 200, 100);

//Lips
fill(eyeballs, 0, 150, 220)
ellipse(eyeballs, 520, 300, 100);

// Eyes
fill(30);
ellipse(mouseX, mouseY, 90, 80);
ellipse(150, eyeballs, 90, 80);
ellipse(400, eyeballs, 90, 80);
ellipse(400, 250, 90, 80);
ellipse(150, 345, 90, 80);
ellipse(400, 345, 90, 80);

eyeballs = eyeballs + 1;
}

function mousePressed() {
createCanvas(550, 650);
rectMode(CENTER);

background(200,20,250);

// Body
colorMode(230, 200, 80, 100);
stroke(270, 250, 100, 600)
fill(200, 150, 0, 150);
rect(270, 250, 100, 600);

// Eyes
fill(‘rgb(255,634,63)’);
ellipse(150, 115, 200, 100);
ellipse(150, 230, 200, 100);
ellipse(400, 115, 200, 100);
ellipse(400, 230, 200, 100);
ellipse(150, 345, 200, 100);
ellipse(400, 345, 200, 100);

//Lips
fill(250, 250, 150, 120)
ellipse(275, 520, 300, 100);

// Eyes
fill(30);
ellipse(150, 115, 90, 80);
ellipse(150, 250, 90, 80);
ellipse(400, 115, 90, 80);
ellipse(400, 250, 90, 80);
ellipse(150, 345, 90, 80);
ellipse(400, 345, 90, 80);
}

#2 Electronic Labs

Things went pretty smoothly with these labs. In the first lab I soldered a female dc and powered the breadboard directly using a voltage stabilizer and a 580 resistor with an LED. I then added a button switch to the circuit for on/off function. IMG_6566IMG_6567IMG_6568

IMG_6577IMG_6576

IMG_6578

IMG_6579

I then connected the breadboard and Arduino Uno with an LED circuit, using the same resistor and used the USB for power and to communicate with the laptop. I ran the code in the Arduino software to make the LED blink.

IMG_6570IMG_6569IMG_6575IMG_6573IMG_6571IMG_6572

ICM #1 – Screen Drawing / ICM & My Interests

Screen Drawing

Once I got a hang of the x,y axis, height/width, color functions it was pretty satisfying and user friendly. I made a symmetrical face comprising of 3 eyes, based off of a drawing I did when I was younger. The middle eye is dripping down, a little break from the symmetry and an allusion to motion. I did a mixture of measuring the units and eyeballing (lol) for placement. I’m looking forward to playing further with depth and color intensity.

 

Screen Shot 2017-09-13 at 2.29.57 PM.png

Screen Shot 2017-09-13 at 2.23.35 PM.png

My Interests & CM

My background is in music production, art & movement. I’d love to develop multimedia shows where sound, graphics and movement interact. I’ve been increasingly into exploring various healing modalities and rituals and would like to incorporate into my art more. I’m thinking of doing one type of show with a very small number of participants, where they are enveloped in a multi-sensory way with the lines of performance / spectator / show / ritual being blurred.

Class #1 Interactivity

I agree with Chris Crawford’s definition of interaction as being a cyclical exchange where output, levels of absorption and response are essential. This implies a change in both participants (person and technology) as a result. I think the level of transformation is a large factor in describing how interactive it is.  

Victor’s argument of “pictures under glass” technology forsaking our amazing and complex hand capabilities, could be a helpful viewpoint to incorporate in the quest to strengthen true interactivity. The interaction could become more profound and attractive when our innate strengths are factored into the design further. The technology becomes more human as opposed to people becoming more robotic. This is one factor that makes for “good” physical interaction, even when we want to interact with tech, we still want it to feel as natural as possible. When we are faced with a technology that is meant to bring us out of our comfort zone specifically, some sense of familiarity, or safety, is helpful to prime the participant to be open to an expansive experience. As was mentioned in class, incorporating elements of fun and play are very helpful to ease inhibitions as well.

A good examples of digital technology that is very engaging but isn’t interactive is VR 360. EEG Biofeedback is an example of a non-interactive technology that interacts with your physiology, with the potential of causing positive transformation in the participant, but does not complete the interactive circuit because the user is not also transforming the technology.